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It’s National Fuel Poverty Awareness Day!

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It’s National Fuel Poverty Awareness Day and in support of this SE2 have created this list of 13 interesting facts:

  1. Fuel poverty in England is measured by the Low Income High Costs definition, which considers a household to be in fuel poverty if ‘they have required fuel costs that are above average (the national median level) and were they to spend that amount they would be left with a residual income below the official poverty line’.
  2. Fuel Poverty Awareness Day is the national day of action, raising awareness of the problems faced by low-income households. The initiative, coordinated by National Energy Action (NEA), falls at the end of its winter Warm Homes Campaign. The Home Heat Helplinesupports the initiative and will be working closely with the NEA on future campaigns.
  3. The Committee on Climate Change’s Fifth Carbon Budgetoutlined that fuel poverty has risen to 4.5 million households (2013) from 3.3 million (2007) and suggests that even with fully funded targeted action it could take around 15 years to return to the position we were in eight years ago.
  4. According to a recent reportpublished by ACE, cold homes are currently a bigger killer across the UK than road and rail accidents, alcohol or drug abuse.
  5. There are around 4 million children living in fuel poverty in England according to a new reportpublished by the National Children’s Bureau.
  6. The latest Excess Winter Mortality in England and Wales statistical bulletin released by the Office for National Statistics states ‘an estimated 43,900 excess winter deaths occurred in England and Wales in 2014/15. The majority of deaths occurred among people aged 75 and over; there were an estimated 36,300 excess winter deaths in this age group in 2014/15, compared with 7,700 in people aged under 75’.
  7. Citizens Advice have launched a price comparison toolto help consumers compare prices from different energy suppliers. If you’re considering switching, you may find these guides useful from Birmingham Citizens Advice  and Ofgem.
  8. New research reveals Newcastle and Glasgow are the warmest cities in the UK when it comes to being neighbourly, knowing on average five of their neighbours. Birmingham and London are the coldest, knowing an average of three people. These findings have been revealed as the Home Heat Helplinecalls on the nation to #SharetheWarmth, and think about whether a neighbour, friend or family member is at risk and could be eligible for support that will help them stay warm during Britain’s notoriously long winter.
  9. Fuel poverty affects residents even in more affluent areas. SE2have been working with the Royal Borough of Kensington & Chelsea since 2008 to tackle this by promoting the Healthy Homes initiative. The Council’s Healthy Homes hotlinehelps people who are having difficulty keeping their homes warm or keeping up with their energy bills.
  10. On Fuel Poverty Awareness Day the Home Heat Helpline is urging people to call 0800 33 66 99 to see if they may be eligible for help with their energy bills.
  11. Are you a London home owner or an accredited private landlord? You could get £400 from the mayor to replace your old boiler from the London Boiler Cashback scheme.
  12. You could be entitled to £140 off your electricity bill with the Warm Home Discount Scheme.See our pdf here for details of which suppliers are providing the scheme.
  13. And finally, here are a list of some of the events taking place in support of National Fuel Poverty Awareness day:

The Nation’s Biggest Housewarming – NEA

Fuel Poverty Summit – The Northants Warm Homes Partnership

West Midlands Fuel Poverty Forum

Free Drop in for residents – Knowsley Council

Healthy Warm Homes 2016 – Wigan Council

Tackling Fuel Poverty – Key Skills for Front Line Workers – SELCE

Fuel Poverty Advice Session – Local Solutions, Liverpool

Housewarming Advice Events – NE Lincolnshire Council

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